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A Halloween Poem

Oct. 31st, 2014 | 12:47 pm
Where I'm Dancing: My House
Dancing Sensations: thoughtful thoughtful
I'm Dancing To: "I Was a Bird" by Mary Chapin Carpenter and Alison Krause

I wrote a poem for Halloween! And I'm just posting it pretty much everywhere I can think of...

The Point Is Not the Candy

The point is not the candy,
We could get that anywhere,
The point is not the mischief,
That people create there.

The point is not the costumes,
Though they’re a fun addition,
The point’s not even parties,
Though those are a tradition!

The point is just the magic,
And the atmosphere and friends,
The point is fun together,
Those are our only ends.

Even if just for a moment,
We feel like anything could be,
Like something’s there beyond us,
And together, you and me.

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Twinkies

Nov. 16th, 2012 | 07:29 pm
Where I'm Dancing: My Room
Dancing Sensations: amused amused
I'm Dancing To: "Tonight" by Sugarland

In light of the Twinkie mania, this seemed oddly apropos:

http://www.seanbaby.com/hostess/v2batman03.htm

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Cliche Bingo

Jun. 22nd, 2012 | 08:10 pm
Where I'm Dancing: Nona's House
Dancing Sensations: amused amused
I'm Dancing To: "Pills of White Mercury" by Old Blind Dogs

I present to you: Cliche Bingo! Inspired by the list of cliches jducoeur posted. These come from the list he linked to and the Forbes slideshow linked to at the end of the list.

The rules:
Issue everyone a cliche bingo board. Each time you hear a cliche that's on the board, place a counter on that square. The center space with the star is a free space. First one to accumulate an entire row, column, or diagonal of five squares wins. Since everyone has the same board, cliche bingo works best when played by people in different departments or companies and will therefore have exposure to different situations at work. Cliches only count when used in a workplace setting. Cliches said by any players do not count.

Cliche bingo can be played for a pool or for free. The honor system is required by the situation; we trust players will accurately report the cliches they hear.

The board:

Cliche Bingo

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Pelican, Pelican

Feb. 9th, 2012 | 08:37 pm
Where I'm Dancing: My Room on Renee Terrace
Dancing Sensations: contemplative contemplative

Pelican, Pelican

I once knew a Pelican, gentle and kind,

She was fair and retiring and had a strong mind,

Her service to the East was her pride and joy,

She was quick to help others and slow to annoy.

Pelican, Pelican, taking her flight,

Flying away in the darkness of night,

She watches us now from the halls of the kings,

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

She ran the whole kingdom, though never was queen,

Staying instead behind the court’s scenes,

They made her a Tyger, and a Pelican Mistress,

And she was also a Court Baroness.

Pelican, Pelican, taking her flight,

Flying away in the darkness of night,

She watches us now from the halls of the kings,

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

She was a historian and therefore maintained,

The Order of Precedence in the kingdom’s name,

It was a skill that served her so well,

Another area in which she could excel.

Pelican, Pelican, taking her flight,

Flying away in the darkness of night,

She watches us now from the halls of the kings,

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

When Edward was king, she answered his call,

And ran the Crown’s heraldry through the kingdom’s great hall,

She served through the reign despite falling ill,

A tribute indeed to her strength of will.

Pelican, Pelican, taking her flight,

Flying away in the darkness of night,

She watches us now from the halls of the kings,

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

Despite these accomplishments, she was quite shy,

Never in the center, but always nearby,

A true Peer of the realm who everyone knew,

She was always surprised as their regard for her grew.

Pelican, Pelican, taking her flight,

Flying away in the darkness of night,

She watches us now from the halls of the kings,

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

Beloved afar, beloved at home,

Now far beyond us does her soul roam,

Somewhere in a feast hall in the undying land,

She has become a great king's right hand.

Pelican, Pelican, taking her flight,

Flying away in the darkness of night,

She watches us now from the halls of the kings,

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

Pelican, Pelican, so far from home,

Adventures in the stars wherever you roam,

I hope you find challenges suited to you,

You deserve that much rest after all you’ve been through.

Pelican, Pelican, taking her flight,

Flying away in the darkness of night,

She watches us now from the halls of the kings,

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

She carried the kingdom on her golden wings.

__________________

I didn't know her well, but when she died, my first reaction was "I will write her such a song that the SCA will still sing of her for generations to come." My bardic abilities might not be quite up to *that* level, but now, a year later, I did manage to get the inspiration to write her a song. Public post, feel free to share if you want to, and if anyone wants to know the tune I'm happy to sing it for you at an event or something. (Just tell me ahead of time so I can print it out-- I just wrote this; I definitely don't have it memorized yet!)

Tags: ,

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More Game of Thrones

Dec. 24th, 2011 | 04:46 pm
Where I'm Dancing: The Family Room
Dancing Sensations: curious curious
I'm Dancing To: "As I Am" by Heather Dale


More SpoilersCollapse )

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A Game of Thrones

Dec. 24th, 2011 | 02:30 pm
Where I'm Dancing: The Family Room
Dancing Sensations: curious curious
I'm Dancing To: "Christians and Pagans" by Dar Williams


Cut for SpoilersCollapse )

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SCAdian Philosophy

May. 20th, 2010 | 03:35 pm
Where I'm Dancing: My Room
Dancing Sensations: tired tired
I'm Dancing To: "The River Driver" by Great Big Sea

I found this thing on the internet: http://sandradodd.com/ideas/consider3.html 

I don't agree with her central point, that you can't help the king or queen merely because they are the king or queen (in fact, I don't agree with most of the stuff she says about the SCA on that website, though this may be culture clash-- she's from the Outlands), but I'm interested in everyone else's thoughts. I do think the "be nice to newcomers" stuff is valid but that should be happening *anyway*, not on the off chance they might become royalty someday.

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Proof I'm Here for an Education

Feb. 27th, 2010 | 03:54 pm
Where I'm Dancing: My Room
Dancing Sensations: accomplished accomplished
I'm Dancing To: "The River Driver" by Great Big Sea

 Cancer at its most basic level is caused by a mutation in a protein in a cell, or so it was at least implied if not outright stated in my biology class today. Basic biology lesson (okay, a two-minute review of what we took a whole class reviewing and is apparently a separate semester-long class): DNA stays in the nucleus. Copies are made by mRNA, which visits the separated individual strands and makes copies. The copies then leave the cell and are copied again. Sets of three base pairs are called codons. Codons each code for an amino acid (or beginning and ending markers), and a set of amino acids becomes a protein. The reason you code for a protein is because you want that protein to do something. Now, errors in all that copying, or in how the protein folds, will give you a mutant protein. Either it won't bind to the other proteins it was supposed to bind to, resulting in something that was supposed to express and now isn't, or it will bind to something that it wasn't supposed to bind to resulting in something expressing in ways other than it should. This is one of the things that causes cancer.

Now, I know from Molecular Biology that there are repair enzymes floating around which correct errors in the copying and they catch a great many of them. The ones they don't catch still cause problems, though. The original theory, which I think I have just spotted the flaw in, was a question of why one could not simply give extra repair enzymes to those at a high risk for hereditary cancer, since a very obvious possible reason for cancer's heredity would be a genetic flaw in one's repair enzymes. The problem in that theory was the question of protein folding, which I hadn't heard a lot about prior to yesterday (or if I did, I don't remember it). I don't know how that works or if the repair enzymes correct for that. However, presumably they would still correct those forms of cancer which are caused by mutations in the actual genetic copy rather than the folding of the protein.

And that's all very simplistic and obvious and if it were that simple someone would have gotten it ages ago, so I know there is a flaw in my reasoning somewhere. I just can't see it, and presumably as time goes on and I learn more within the class, I will gain a deeper understanding and be able to see it.

However, now I'm going to connect cross-discipline: the above is a perfect example of the concept of a pet theory, which we were looking at in Conceptions and Misconceptions, which is my education class this term. Pet theories are those things we come up with that are based not on science but on mere anecdotal evidence (yes, yes, oxymoron, I know), and I pointed out during class that once we've formed them, we'll remember the unusual incidences that conform to the theory but not the more mundane ones that don't. So even though we know it's irrational, we'll keep it because it seems like it makes logical sense.

Pet theories are themselves an example of what Howard Gardner calls intuitive learning in The Unschooled Mind: the concepts we form in childhood that are immature and based on our experiences, formed by casual observations and cemented early enough in childhood that they remain deep in our core even when we learn traditional schooling later. The problem with traditional schooling is that it doesn't necessarily produce *understanding*; Gardner points out the tacit agreement that we will test students on a particular form and not vary from that form so that we can claim they understand, and when students are asked questions that deviate from the expected forms they revert to their inner intuitive learner, their pet theories. (Or, if you really want me to be blending things, the idea of "revert to training", where under pressure we go back to what we've practiced, "sense" or "body" memory: http://www.thisistrue.com/blog-the_life_you_save_may_be.html) I have seen people get very extreme about the form; I'm recalling a story probably related to this concept about how a student lost credit for writing a math problem vertically rather than horizontally even though the answer was still correct, because the question asked for a "number sentence" solving the problem. Last term there was a reading about understanding, and what it means to understand, since we say we're teaching for understanding. Rarely does it occur to anyone to go back and test understanding, or know what to do about it if they don't get the desired results. Gardner defines understanding as the ability to use the information in a significantly different form from that it in which it was taught, which must be at least somewhat new and unexpected.

Now, to connect this all neatly back in a circle: I am conscious of my theory about cancer prevention likely being inaccurate, based on simplistic theories about how the world works. (And when I'm not half-asleep, I can even tell you which theories, but I'm at the moment too tired to go any deeper into meta than I already have.) I am expecting that the class will give me a greater understanding so that I can determine where the flaws in my reasoning are. If Gardner is to be believed (and if I'm understanding him correctly), this actually happening is very unusual and I am very unusual for realizing that there's got to be something wrong with my theory even if I can't see it. Which seems strange to me because all of this feels so obvious and basic including my suspicions of theories that are obvious and basic, but most people would apparently regard that as an actual theory about how the world works, on the same level of the old physics question about what forces are acting on the thrown quarter after it has left your hand.

Yes, I am indeed here for an education, why do you ask?

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Return of the Webcomics

Jun. 16th, 2009 | 12:31 am
Where I'm Dancing: The Family Room
Dancing Sensations: confused confused
I'm Dancing To: "Seven Drunken Nights" by the Brobdingnagian Bards

http://xkcd.com/364/

I can come close enough to understanding this one that I feel like I should get it, and I'm just far enough off that I can't quite. Someone explain please?

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Personality Test

Apr. 26th, 2009 | 05:16 pm


My Personality
 
Neuroticism
89
Extraversion
1
Openness to Experience
76
Agreeableness
84
Conscientiousness
40
 
You often resist any cravings or urges that you have, but sometimes you give in, however you experience panic, confusion, and helplessness when under pressure or stress. People generally perceive you as distant and reserved, and you do not usually reach out to others. You prefer familiar routines and for things to stay the same. You can tend to feel uncomfortable with change. You do not like to claim that you are better than other people, and generally shy from talking yourself up, however you are mostly a compassionate person, however you prefer to make objective judgments when possible. You take your time when making decisions and will deliberate on all the possible consequences and alternatives.

Free Poll

Cubic Zirconia Earrings

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